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Three Compounds for Managing Any Crisis

nootropics for anxietyCrisis-induced stress is something that varies in degrees. For some, this stress is brought on by having to figure out how to pay a bill on time. For others, crisis-induced stress might mean exactly that, as in the 1962 confrontation between the United States of America and the Soviet Union known as the Cuban Missile Crisis. This stand-off was made up of 13 days of tense negotiations that would decide the fates of millions, if not the entire world itself.

Even though the people negotiating the terms of their agreement knew that the threat of a thermonuclear showdown was unacceptable, their task was still a challenging one.  They would have to work together under that looming danger, and, no matter the size of the threat, people can and do make terrible decisions under pressure [1].

Fortunately for us, they managed to navigate those waters, but we’re not always so lucky under pressure, so how can we fix the odds a bit more heavily in our favor?

3 Compounds for Managing Any Crisis

Theacrine

Theacrine is an alkaloid found in the Cupuacu fruit species and a Chinese tea called kudingcha, or kucha. This compound is used for a number of reasons including reducing stress while it simultaneously increases motivation and focus. Participants in one study rated theacrine higher at increasing their attention, alertness, focus, and energy levels than caffeine did, while their lethargy and grogginess values were also notably lower [2].

Maybe the best part of theacrine is the fact that, unlike its counterpart caffeine, there is no tachyphylaxis, even after eight weeks of continuous use. This is important to note, because the tachyphylactic response is basically a decreased reaction to a compound given over a period of time, requiring larger and larger doses to achieve the same effect. So, unlike caffeine, which requires higher dosages over time, theacrine causes no tolerance and it should remain effective for as long as you need [3].

Alpha-GPC

If you’re constantly distracted — probably because you’d rather be doing anything than the work or study assignment you should be doing — Alpha-GPC is your supplement.

Alpha-GPC (Alpha-glycerophosphocholine) is a cholinergic compound and it has proven very effective at controlling impulsiveness and increasing self-control [4, 5], while displaying the ability to increase focus and motivation [6]

Alpha-GPC is also fantastic to supplement with when you would like to improve your mood and reduce stress since it releases GABA (an amino acid found in the body that has a calming effect) [7], and its supplementation increases the body’s natural levels of dopamine and serotonin – two neurotransmitters that have a big impact on improving mood [8].

Emoxypine Succinate

Emoxypine Succinate is a newer nootropic with that doesn’t behave like other nootropics — it doesn’t alter neurotransmitters to prevent neurological decline. Instead, emoxypine, also known as Mexidol and Mexifin, neutralizes free radicals that contribute to neurological decline [9]. But that’s not why it made this list. Emoxypine is a great choice for crunch time because it offers something a lot of calming compounds don’t – relief from situational anxiety [10]. Based on that finding, it seems safe to assume emoxypine will be perfectly suited to those crisis situations that trigger an anxiety all their own.

Fortunately, the Cuban Missile Crisis is over, so you won’t have to make any decisions quite that big, but, for those situations you do have to manage, this stack will help you figure it all out with a clear, stress-free head.

Sources

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK219168/
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26610558
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26766930
  4. http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=175211
  5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20428999
  6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21156078
  7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8726961
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16739923
  9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12056134

Best Nootropics for Anxiety

Anxiety is an important part of human physiology and in many ways is what keeps us from living an accident prone disastrous lifestyle. A natural way of our body telling us we are in a potentially dangerous or harmful situation anxiety is a necessary response that promotes longevity in human life. With all that said; anxiety is often associated with stress and is generally seen in a negative light in most circles. The true villain here is “over-anxiety” and the body’s physical response which can include an increase in perspiration and heartbeat.  If we were anxiety free all the time we would be much more likely to engage in dangerous and potentially life threatening activities that would greatly hamper our life expectancy. So, why am I telling you all of this and how can we use nootropics to curb intense anxiety that may constrain our lives?

Nootropics are often used to enhance memory and improve cognitive function but they have also been shown to have anti-anxiety and stress reducing properties. Specifically there are certain nootropics that when taking in conjunction work synergistically to achieve this desired effect. There are a number of nootropics available that can alleviate anxiety and in many cases a trial and error method of experimentation may be required to find the optimal solution for your needs.

Nootropics for Anxiety

In this analysis of anti-anxiety nootropics we will take a look at a few different nootropic options including theanine, GABA, 5-htp, bacopa, and rhodiola. Theanine is the only nootropic that has the ability to simultaneously increase serotonin and GABA levels, both of which are associated with lowering anxiety levels. Alternatively direct GABA supplementation is more effective in raising GABA levels and 5-htp or bacopa can be more effective in raising serotonin levels. So, if you are looking for a one and done solution theanine seems to be your best option. Rhodiola is one of the only nootropics that specifically halts the breakdown of serotonin in the brain and has shown a significant effectiveness in research, therefore I suggest supplementing with rhodiola in addition to other nootropics in most cases. A combination of rhodiola and either 5-htp (a naturally occurring anti-anxiety and stress reducing amino acid) or bacopa (an herb that has shown to increase serotonin in the brain) is recommended for the best anti-anxiety results with nootropics.

While this recommended combination/stack has shown to be effective and is a good starting point, the topic of nootropics is notorious for being uncharted territory and should be approached with that in mind. This means that one should always pay attention to your body’s individual response and conduct personal research on a supplement or supplements before consuming them.

Nootropic supplementation can be an exciting and often very effective method of attaining your desired results in your personal health related goals. Always pay attention to your products packaging and label information for dosing guidelines and it is recommended you consult a doctor before implementing nootropics in to your daily routine.

Sources

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12467378

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11498727

Nootropics to Raise Your Social Acuity

Accurately understanding the state of mind of those around and closest to you can benefit you in a number of ways; comprehending individual boundaries within your social circle, as well as knowing what to say, how to say it, and when it is appropriate to speak. But possibly the most useful aspect of one’s social perception is being able to assess and utilize information within different professional situations, like job interviews, to your advantage. You can train yourself to pick up certain cues in these situations, but many things can prevent us from being able to accurately ascertain these hints. Two of the biggest factors [1] that inhibit us from correctly understanding those around us are low moods and social anxiety, both of which tend to hinder our ability to socialize in the first place. In order to offset the negative effects of these obstacles, and eventually rebuild our understanding of our close relationships, a supplement of the nootropic Piracetam has been shown to encourage improvement in these areas.

What is Piracetam?

Classified under the umbrella of the nootropic racetams, Piracetam [2] is a derivative of the essential neurotransmitter GABA, the primary neurotransmitter in the human body. Piracetam has been used and studied since the early 1970s as an aid in age related cognitive impairment, increased mental capacity and activity, and as an over the counter supplement for low moods and anxiety. When taken orally, Piracetam has the unique abilities of near complete absorption within the body and ease of transition between the blood and brain barrier.

How can Piracetam help?

The first step towards an improved social awareness begins with boosting mood and lowering anxiety. Piracetam [2, 3] has been shown to decrease the negative symptoms associated with these conditions through the improved functioning and communication between neurotransmitters in the body as well as proper activity in neural pathways. Piracetam [3] also helps to increase the influx of calcium into the neuronal cells to further bolster neurotransmitter actions at synaptic junctions. Additionally, due to its anxiolytic properties, Piracetam [4] has been shown to decrease antisocial behavior brought on by anxiety. A recent study [4] demonstrated that Piracetam produced no sedative like side effects, bolstered production of the happy hormone Serotonin, and ultimately operated just as effectively as different prescription antidepressants. In order to properly function within different social settings, and subsequently increase the understanding of friends and relations, one must be able to overcome personal shortcomings as to place themselves in a position to effectively communicate with those around them.

Sources:

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3783401
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piracetam
  3. http://link.springer.com/article/10.2165%2F11319230-000000000-00000
  4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/95599