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Three Compounds for Managing Any Crisis

nootropics for anxietyCrisis-induced stress is something that varies in degrees. For some, this stress is brought on by having to figure out how to pay a bill on time. For others, crisis-induced stress might mean exactly that, as in the 1962 confrontation between the United States of America and the Soviet Union known as the Cuban Missile Crisis. This stand-off was made up of 13 days of tense negotiations that would decide the fates of millions, if not the entire world itself.

Even though the people negotiating the terms of their agreement knew that the threat of a thermonuclear showdown was unacceptable, their task was still a challenging one.  They would have to work together under that looming danger, and, no matter the size of the threat, people can and do make terrible decisions under pressure [1].

Fortunately for us, they managed to navigate those waters, but we’re not always so lucky under pressure, so how can we fix the odds a bit more heavily in our favor?

3 Compounds for Managing Any Crisis

Theacrine

Theacrine is an alkaloid found in the Cupuacu fruit species and a Chinese tea called kudingcha, or kucha. This compound is used for a number of reasons including reducing stress while it simultaneously increases motivation and focus. Participants in one study rated theacrine higher at increasing their attention, alertness, focus, and energy levels than caffeine did, while their lethargy and grogginess values were also notably lower [2].

Maybe the best part of theacrine is the fact that, unlike its counterpart caffeine, there is no tachyphylaxis, even after eight weeks of continuous use. This is important to note, because the tachyphylactic response is basically a decreased reaction to a compound given over a period of time, requiring larger and larger doses to achieve the same effect. So, unlike caffeine, which requires higher dosages over time, theacrine causes no tolerance and it should remain effective for as long as you need [3].

Alpha-GPC

If you’re constantly distracted — probably because you’d rather be doing anything than the work or study assignment you should be doing — Alpha-GPC is your supplement.

Alpha-GPC (Alpha-glycerophosphocholine) is a cholinergic compound and it has proven very effective at controlling impulsiveness and increasing self-control [4, 5], while displaying the ability to increase focus and motivation [6]

Alpha-GPC is also fantastic to supplement with when you would like to improve your mood and reduce stress since it releases GABA (an amino acid found in the body that has a calming effect) [7], and its supplementation increases the body’s natural levels of dopamine and serotonin – two neurotransmitters that have a big impact on improving mood [8].

Emoxypine Succinate

Emoxypine Succinate is a newer nootropic with that doesn’t behave like other nootropics — it doesn’t alter neurotransmitters to prevent neurological decline. Instead, emoxypine, also known as Mexidol and Mexifin, neutralizes free radicals that contribute to neurological decline [9]. But that’s not why it made this list. Emoxypine is a great choice for crunch time because it offers something a lot of calming compounds don’t – relief from situational anxiety [10]. Based on that finding, it seems safe to assume emoxypine will be perfectly suited to those crisis situations that trigger an anxiety all their own.

Fortunately, the Cuban Missile Crisis is over, so you won’t have to make any decisions quite that big, but, for those situations you do have to manage, this stack will help you figure it all out with a clear, stress-free head.

Sources

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK219168/
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26610558
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26766930
  4. http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=175211
  5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20428999
  6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21156078
  7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8726961
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16739923
  9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12056134